Posts Tagged ‘butter’

Sour Cream Biscuits

Posted: 11th November 2013 by doomthings in Breakfast, The Foodening
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My dad used to make sour cream biscuits almost every weekend for as long as I can remember.  When we were old enough, he let us put on his apron and chef hat (yup, totally) to help cut out biscuits of every conceivable shape; well, of the cookie cutter shapes we had.  I distinctly remember being covered in flour, bringing my mom biscuits and juice in bed every chance we got.  I don’t think biscuits were her favorite breakfast food, but she at least pretended to like them while we pressed our faces to hers to make sure she had some breakfast.

As an adult, my childlike impulses led me to purchase an insane amount of cookie cutters.  Said impulses also led me to make biscuits for breakfast because they’re delicious and we didn’t have any milk for cereal.  The only thing I change consistantly from my dad’s original recipe:  I always use butter instead of crisco.  It’s easier cleanup and butter is awesome.  (Also I don’t have crisco).

Sour Cream Biscuits | doomthings

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 2 tsp sugar or honey
  • 1/2 tsp cream of tartar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 2 tbsp milk

Directions:

  1. Combine dry ingredients in a large bowl.
  2. Cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.
  3. Add milk and sour cream and stir until a soft dough forms.
  4. Knead dough on a floured surface, 10 – 12 times.
  5. Roll dough out to a thickness of about 1/2 an inch.
  6. Cut out biscuits with desired cookie cutter shapes.
  7. Bake at 450 degrees F for 10 – 12 minutes.

Serve warm with butter, flavored butter, jam, honey, etc…

Butter

Posted: 23rd October 2013 by doomthings in Dessert, The Foodening, Tips & Tricks
Tags: , , , , ,

I used to microwave butter before using it in baked goods.  I sometimes still do because I get seriously lazy or want soft butter RIGHT NOW.  You can leave butter out (in a butter dish) for a while and it won’t go bad, contrary to popular belief.  Really, it’s better to just take out sticks of butter the day before you plan to make something and let it soften on it’s own.  Mostly cuz the baked goods [COOKIES] will be fluffier, but also this: 

Seriously, this will happen:

Microwaving Butter | The Oatmeal Microwaving Butter | The Oatmeal

All these images are belong to The Oatmeal.

This is a re-post of an older post.  I made this and devoured it almost immediately (with the help of my husband) so originally, there were no pictures.  Now, there are pictures.  Also, I highly recommend you make this.  Right now.  Go.

Ingredients (adapted from One Good Thing by Jillee):

  • 5 1/2 cups warm milk
  • 3 packages (each package is 2 1/4 tsp) active dry yeast
  • 2 tablespoons salt
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 11 cups bread flour

Directions:

  1. Mix all ingredients together.
  2. Let rise for 30 – 60 minutes (until about doubled).
  3. Spoon into (4) well greased (and floured) loaf pans.
  4. Let rise in pans until dough reaches the top of the pans (30 – 60 minutes).
  5. Bake in 350 degree oven for 45 minutes or until golden brown.
  6. 10 minutes before done, brush with melted butter.  Bread will be moist at first, so allow to cool completely before cutting.

My favorite part of this recipe is that I get to throw all the ingredients in the bowl, mix, and watch.  Most yeast bread recipes require the yeast to sit in vaguely warm water and activate.  This may be why the texture is so much moister and spongier than other yeast breads.

You can eat this bread as-is, but toasting slices is so worth the wait.  I did notice that I needed to toast a single piece on the “7” setting on my toaster oven.  This might be because it is such a moist bread.  Honey, jam, butter, or other bread-spreads are all fantastic on this bread!  It lasts barely two days in our house if we don’t control ourselves (I usually half the recipe to make just two loaves just for this reason).

A few notes:

  • On this go-round, I ended up having to let the dough sit overnight because I didn’t have time to bake it the same day.  While it still ended up tasting really good, but there was an additional fermented “sourdough” flavor, not unlike the flavor I like added to my pizza dough.  I would suggest that you don’t let it sit overnight.  Try to bake these the same day.
  • You’ll notice that the baked pictures look sort of funny and are smaller than the risen picture.  This is because they sat overnight.  Normally, the baked bread would be the same size as the pre-baked risen dough.
  • Lastly, I forgot to let the dough rise in the bowl.  This didn’t seem to affect the flavor or texture.  I just let the dough rise for twice as long in the pans.


+ 20 deliciosity

I don’t have a picture because I ate this before I had the chance.  To be fair, I didn’t think I would be making a post about this because, c’mon, it’s banana bread.  Everyone makes banana bread.  I really should just document everything before I let my brain run things.

I made regular old banana bread and used a regular old banana bread recipe.  So I’m not going to repeat it here (well… maybe later… when I remember to take pictures).  Just know that this is what I replaced to make a very different tasting (yet equally delicious) bread.

OLD INGREDIENTS:

  • Granulated sugar
  • Oil
  • Nuts

NEW INGREDIENTS:

  • Dark brown sugar
  • Melted butter
  • Chocolate chips

Replace these one-for-one and you get a very ginger-bread-esque quick bread (probably because of the dark brown sugar; gotta love molasses!).  It’s more crumbly and less moist than regular banana bread and is distinctly different.  I wouldn’t replace banana bread with this, I would simple also make this bread, contributing even more to my love of bread.  This is banana bread’s delicious cousin.  Love him! +6 science

This is my very favorite bread ever.  Since trying it for the first time after finding it on One Good Thing by Jillee via Pinterest, my husband and I always try to find reasons to make it.  This is horrible, because I’m pretty sure it clogs my arteries with every bite.  Regardless, we make it all the time.

One reason we attempt to make this almost every week is that it is, as previously mentioned, delicious.  The other reason is that it is completely easy to make.  Perhaps tooooooo easy…

English Muffin Bread | doomthings

Ingredients (adapted from One Good Thing by Jillee):

  • 5 1/2 cups warm water
  • 3 packages (each package is 2 1/4 tsp) active dry yeast
  • 2 Tablespoons salt
  • 3 Tablespoons sugar
  • 11 cups bread flour

Directions:

  1. Mix all ingredients together.
  2. Let rise for 30 – 60 minutes (until about doubled).
  3. Spoon into (4) well greased loaf pans.
  4. Let rise in pans until dough reaches the top of the pans (30 – 60 minutes).
  5. Bake in 350 degree oven for 45 minutes or until golden brown.
  6. 10 minutes before done, brush with melted butter.  Bread will be moist at first, so allow to cool completely before cutting.

In the original recipe, rapid-rise yeast is used, which means you can skip the first rise and just let them rise in the pans.  I haven’t done this (because I don’t have rapid-rise yeast), but it makes the ease of this recipe double!  My favorite part of this recipe is that I get to throw all the ingredients in the bowl, mix, and watch.  Most yeast bread recipes require the yeast to sit in vaguely warm water and activate.  I wonder if this is why the texture is so much moister and spongier than other yeast breads.

You can eat this bread as-is, but toasting slices is so worth the wait.  I did notice that I needed to toast a single piece on the “7” setting on my toaster oven.  This might be because it is such a moist bread.  I like honey on it (a new development), but jam, butter, or other bread-spreads are just as good.  This bread would last maybe two days in our house if we didn’t control ourselves (I usually half the recipe to make just two loaves just for this reason).  + 20 delicious points.